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The Time is Always NowBlack Political Thought and the Transformation of US Democracy$
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Nicholas Bromell

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199973439

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199973439.001.0001

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“The Moment We’re In”

“The Moment We’re In”

The Democratic Imagination of Barack Obama

Chapter:
(p.129) 6 “The Moment We’re In”
Source:
The Time is Always Now
Author(s):

Nick Bromell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199973439.003.0007

This chapter first considers speculations about Barack Obama's core political philosophy and then examines his relation to the thinkers discussed in this book. It argues that Obama seems farthest from these thinkers when his pursuit of unity is contrasted with their appreciation of indignation and the “collaborative antagonism” of democracy. He seems closest to them in his pursuit of enlargement, his willingness to sustain irreconcilables in tension with each other, and in his understanding of the partiality and fallibility of all forms of faith. Above all, in adapting to the exigencies of the present moment, he is faithful to these figures' radical realism—their understanding of themselves as situated citizens and activists.

Keywords:   political philosophy, public philosophy, politics, Barack Obama, democracy, indignation, faith, radical realism

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