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Disability, Culture, and DevelopmentA Case Study of Japanese Children at School$
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Misa Kayama and Wendy Haight

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199970827

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199970827.001.0001

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Children’s and Parents’ Experiences of Disability as They Transition into Special Education

Children’s and Parents’ Experiences of Disability as They Transition into Special Education

Chapter:
(p.151) 7 Children’s and Parents’ Experiences of Disability as They Transition into Special Education
Source:
Disability, Culture, and Development
Author(s):

Misa Kayama

Wendy Haight

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199970827.003.0007

This chapter describes children’s perspectives on their disabilities or “difficulties,” how they experienced the new, formal system of special education, and the challenges and responses of their parents. Dai’s case illustrates the role of educators in helping children and their parents transition to special education. Educators created an environment in which Dai could fully benefit from support outside of his general education classroom, and guided his mother to accept his needs for special education. Kakeru’s case illustrates the importance of parental understanding of their children’s disabilities and provision of developmentally-appropriate support in collaboration with educators. Kakeru’s parents also created a protected environment at home from which he could face the challenges at school. Yusuke, who is older than the other two children, articulated his own understanding of his difficulties. His case illustrates his struggles and the process through which he learned to cope with hardships and understand his “difficulties.”

Keywords:   home–school collaboration, children’s understandings of their disabilities, developmentally appropriate support, parental acceptance of their children’s disabilities, peer relationships, Japanese education

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