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Semantic PerceptionHow the Illusion of a Common Language Arises and Persists$
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Jody Azzouni

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199967407

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199967407.001.0001

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Second Methodological Interlude

Second Methodological Interlude

Chapter:
(p.245) Second Methodological Interlude
Source:
Semantic Perception
Author(s):

Jody Azzouni

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199967407.003.0010

A second stepping back and drawing of general conclusions from the specific arguments that have occurred in earlier chapters. All our intuitions about language are shown to arise from our experience of language and from folk semantic inferences that we routinely draw on the basis of that experience. These intuitions explain how a particular approach to semantics—Tarskian in flavour—seems so natural despite the fact that nothing like it is operative in natural languages. The question is raised about how much our knowledge of the true state of affairs (regarding language) can infiltrate our experience. The conclusion is that our experience of language will be pretty resistant to change.

Keywords:   phenomenological compartmentalization, model-theoretic semantics, second-looks, plasticity of language perception, modular processes and central processes, core cognition

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