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The Treasures of Alexander the GreatHow One Man's Wealth Shaped the World$
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Frank L. Holt

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199950966

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199950966.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.146) Chapter 7 Conclusion
Source:
The Treasures of Alexander the Great
Author(s):

Frank L. Holt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199950966.003.0007

Alexander’s reputation as a king and conqueror has evolved considerably over the centuries. His war-won wealth has elicited numerous moral judgments, and in this chapter these are traced from ancient to modern times. A turning point can be identified in the nineteenth century when Alexander’s looting was praised by the influential historian J. G. Droysen, who claimed that the Persian kings were “vampires” sucking the lifeblood of their empire. Alexander, on the other hand, liberated that wealth and put it into productive circulation as coinage. This chapter tests the monetization thesis and finds that it has been overstated. Alexander was no business tycoon or entrepreneurial genius; his chief aim was to weaponize his wealth, not to grow the ancient economy.

Keywords:   Monetization, Coinage, J. G. Droysen, Moral judgments, Ancient economy

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