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Defining the StruggleNational Racial Justice Organizing, 1880-1915$
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Susan D. Carle

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945740

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945740.001.0001

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A New Generation of Post-Reconstruction Leaders

A New Generation of Post-Reconstruction Leaders

Chapter:
(p.13) 1 A New Generation of Post-Reconstruction Leaders
Source:
Defining the Struggle
Author(s):

Susan D. Carle

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945740.003.0002

This chapter examines the backgrounds and early adult experiences of five key leaders of the national organizations the book considers. These leaders are T. Thomas Fortune, founder of the National Afro-American League; Reverdy C. Ransom, the earliest outspoken radical within the National Afro-American Council; Mary Church Terrell, founding leader of the National Association of Colored Women; Mary White Ovington, member of the NAACP's inner circle of founders; and William Lewis Bulkley, a founder and early board member of the National Urban League. The chapter explores the similarities and differences of these leaders' backgrounds as well as the early development of their activist ideas and commitments.

Keywords:   post-Reconstruction era, African American leaders, T. Thomas Fortune, Reverdy C. Ransom, African American social settlement activists, Mary Church Terrell, Mary White Ovington, William Lewis Bulkley

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