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Between Heaven and HellIslam, Salvation, and the Fate of Others$
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Mohammad Hassan Khalil

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945399

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945399.001.0001

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The Food of the Damned

The Food of the Damned

Chapter:
(p.255) 11 The Food of the Damned
Source:
Between Heaven and Hell
Author(s):

David M. Freidenreich

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945399.003.0011

In chapter 11, David M. Freidenreich argues that medieval Muslim legal and theological discussions concerning non-Muslims—even in those cases where scholars promote an inclusivist vision—typically demonstrate a lack of interest in the non-Muslim people who serve as the objects of their discourse. Whether one examines legal discussions concerning the permissibility of food offered by non-Muslims or soteriological discussions concerning their fate, one generally finds that, to quote Freidenreich, non-Muslims “function primarily as screens upon which those who speak on behalf of Islam project abstract ideas about the nature of Islam[.]” Freidenreich suggests that this remains the case in contemporary soteriological discourse, despite the fact that Muslim theologians today often demonstrate relatively more interest in non-Muslims as people.

Keywords:   Islam, Muslim, Salvation, Sharia, Islamic theology, pluralism, inclusivism, exclusivism, dietary laws (or: food), afterlife

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