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The Legal Language of Scottish BurghsStandardization and Lexical Bundles (1380-1560)$
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Joanna Kopaczyk

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945153

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945153.001.0001

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Long Bundles

Long Bundles

Functional Properties and Standardization

Chapter:
(p.242) 12 Long Bundles
Source:
The Legal Language of Scottish Burghs
Author(s):

Joanna Kopaczyk

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945153.003.0012

The final analytical chapter concentrates on the long lexico-syntactic strings, which recur in an unchanged form in the corpus. There are no comparable studies of long lexical bundles, so the findings pave the way for our understanding of textual standardization in specialized discourse. These lexical bundles are relatively less frequent but still they recur frequently enough to constitute functional hubs in the texts. The propensity to overlap and create much longer strings is also visible here. The bundles are discussed in a diachronic sequence, which enables the reader to trace popular patterns and their competitors in time. Two chronological formulaicity peaks are discernible in the material. The bundles have also been analysed with regard to their provenance, which allowed for localizing the key geographical areas of textual standardization in medieval and early modern Scotland.

Keywords:   lexical bundles, standardization, functionalism, formulaicity, syntagmatic overlap, paradigmatic overlap, diachronic distribution, regional distribution

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