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The Language of Bribery Cases$
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Roger W. Shuy

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945139

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945139.001.0001

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The linguistic tools for dealing with bribery

The linguistic tools for dealing with bribery

Chapter:
(p.39) [3] The linguistic tools for dealing with bribery
Source:
The Language of Bribery Cases
Author(s):

Roger W. Shuy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945139.003.0003

The linguistic unit of the speech event is defined as a recurring occasion that has tacitly understood rules of preference and unspoken conventions as to what can and cannot count as valid. All relatively smaller language units, including the schemas, agendas (topics and responses), speech acts (such as agreeing, rejecting, promising, and others) are governed by the structure and intentionality revealed by the speech event in which they are situated. Court cases often focus primarily on the smallest language units where the alleged “smoking gun” comments are found, while ignoring the larger language context identified by the larger language units in which the smoking gun language takes place. The bribery speech event is then described in detail.

Keywords:   speech event, social norms, power and ritual, clues to intentions, schemas, agendas, topics, responses, speech acts, conversational strategies, smoking guns

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