Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dance on Its Own TermsHistories and Methodologies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Melanie Bales and Karen Eliot

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199939985

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199939985.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Touchstones of Tradition and Innovation

Touchstones of Tradition and Innovation

PAS DE DEUX BY PETIPA, BALANCHINE AND FORSYTHE

Chapter:
(p.175) 7 Touchstones of Tradition and Innovation
Source:
Dance on Its Own Terms
Author(s):

Melanie Bales

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199939985.003.0010

“Touchstones of Tradition and Innovation: Pas de Deux by Petipa, Balanchine and Forsythe” closely juxtaposes three duets from different centuries and styles, though each is located within the ballet idiom. A comparative analysis forces inquiries into the codes and values of the balletic form itself, with a consideration of those values as they emerge through the steps and choreographic structures of the dances, the identities of the choreographers and the sociopolitical climate surrounding the creation of each work. The three examples are signposts by which to see the effects of time upon a classical tradition, and they demonstrate how both individual artists and collective choices have shaped that tradition.

Keywords:   ballet, pas de deux, petipa, balanchine, forsythe, comparative analysis, choreographers, classical tradition

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .