Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Gods in AmericaReligious Pluralism in the United States$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Charles L. Cohen and Ronald L. Numbers

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199931903

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199931903.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 July 2019

Buddhism, Art, and Transcultural Collage: Toward a Cultural History of Buddhism in the United States, 1945–2000

Buddhism, Art, and Transcultural Collage: Toward a Cultural History of Buddhism in the United States, 1945–2000

Chapter:
(p.193) Chapter 8 Buddhism, Art, and Transcultural Collage: Toward a Cultural History of Buddhism in the United States, 1945–2000
Source:
Gods in America
Author(s):

Thomas A. Tweed

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199931903.003.0008

Beginning in the late nineteenth century and intensifying between the 1940s and 1960s, a complex transcultural process allowed decontextualized Buddhist beliefs, practices, and artifacts to circulate widely among Americans, especially those who did not themselves identify with Buddhist traditions. After the “Zen boom” of the 1950s, Buddhism during the Vietnam Era became associated with conflict and violence. Yet Buddhism's Asian and American popularisers managed to break that representational link, and the tradition emerged as a tolerant spiritual alternative and an adaptable cultural implement. Liberated from the constraints of precedent and released from tradition's inertial force, Buddhism could become almost anything in the transnational flow of representations. A proper discussion of American pluralism needs to assess not only the number of followers a religion accumulates but also its cultural impact. By that metric, Buddhism's influence has been so great since 1945 that one may fairly talk about the “Buddhification of America.”

Keywords:   Zen Buddhism, Vietnam War, Suzuki Daisetz Teitarō, [D. T. Suzuki], Buddhism and art, Buddhism and American culture

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .