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What Is Adaptive about Adaptive Memory?$
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Bennett L. Schwartz, Mark L. Howe, Michael P. Toglia, and Henry Otgaar

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199928057

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199928057.001.0001

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Proximate Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying the Survival Processing Effect

Proximate Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying the Survival Processing Effect

Chapter:
(p.172) 10 Proximate Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying the Survival Processing Effect
Source:
What Is Adaptive about Adaptive Memory?
Author(s):

Edgar Erdfelder

Meike Kroneisen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199928057.003.0010

The authors conclude that four well-established domain-general mechanisms of human memory—memorial benefits caused by (1) arousal, (2) item congruity, (3) richness of encoding, and (4) the combination of single-item and relational processing—have proven successful in accounting for many results on moderators and mediators of the SPE. In contrast, hypotheses attributing the SPE to the operation of domain-specific, evolutionarily acquired “cognitive modules” tailored to solve specific adaptive problems our ancestors faced in Pleistocene environments (i.e., survival modules or planning modules) were less successful.

Keywords:   Adaptive memory, survival processing, natural selection, encoding, arousal

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