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Suffering and Bioethics$
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Ronald M. Green and Nathan J. Palpant

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199926176

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199926176.001.0001

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Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and the Prevention of Suffering

Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and the Prevention of Suffering

Chapter:
(p.404) 20 Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and the Prevention of Suffering
Source:
Suffering and Bioethics
Author(s):

Mary Anderlik Majumder

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199926176.003.0020

Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) raises questions about parental obligations in light of the possibility of suffering. This chapter highlights some of the complexities in discussions of suffering, prenatal testing, and genetic conditions and in debates about whether there is a duty to select the “most advantaged” child or only to assure that a child’s life exceeds some minimum threshold. Consideration of these complexities informs an examination of two policy questions: whether it is permissible to use PGD to select for disability, and whether there is a duty to use PGD to prevent the birth of a child with a “serious” genetic condition. This chapter argues that the scope of practice permitted by law should be broad enough to accommodate a range of reasonable viewpoints and the differing capacities of prospective parents.

Keywords:   suffering, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, prenatal testing, disability, parental obligations

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