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Trade Usages and Implied Terms in the Age of Arbitration$

Fabien Gélinas

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199916016

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199916016.001.0001

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(p.xi) Foreword

(p.xi) Foreword

Source:
Trade Usages and Implied Terms in the Age of Arbitration
Author(s):

Fabien Gélinas

Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This book, a directed collection of papers, is the result of several years of a sporadic but fruitful research collaboration under the aegis of McGill’s Private Justice and the Rule of Law Research Team. Four of the contributors are part of that team: Professors Geneviève Saumier and Marie-Claude Rigaud, doctoral student Giacomo Marchisio, and myself. Our regretted colleague Professor H. Patrick Glenn was also part of the team when he passed in the fall of 2014 after completing his contribution. He was a source of boundless inspiration and joy, and a mentor to all of us. This book is dedicated to him.

The book is being brought out after many delays, for which I take responsibility. The organization and implementation of the data collection behind the contribution on arbitral practice proved difficult and could only be carried out some time after the national law contributions had been completed. I am grateful to the contributors for the patience and kindness they displayed throughout this project.

It gives me pleasure to acknowledge the financial and other support without which the project could not have been carried through to completion. The Quebec granting agency FRQSC provided the funding for a workshop as well as for the data collection and the preparation of the manuscript for publication. The Norton Rose Fulbright Faculty Fund also contributed to research assistance for the project. My thanks go to McGill Law Dean Daniel Jutras for his unflinching support and understanding. Emily Grant left her editorial mark on all of the papers; I owe her a debt of gratitude for much of the work produced under the aegis of the team over the years. I wish finally to thank Giacomo Marchisio, whose quiet energy has allowed the project to retain momentum at critical junctures.

It is hoped that the result will serve as a reference on usages and implied terms for some years to come.

Fabien Gélinas

31 August 2015 (p.xii)