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The Rational SouthernerBlack Mobilization, Republican Growth, and the Partisan Transformation of the American South$
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M. V. Hood III, Quentin Kidd, and Irwin L. Morris

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199873821

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199873821.001.0001

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Relative Advantage and Republican Growth at the Substate Level

Relative Advantage and Republican Growth at the Substate Level

Chapter:
(p.118) Chapter 6 Relative Advantage and Republican Growth at the Substate Level
Source:
The Rational Southerner
Author(s):

M. V. Hood III

Quentin Kidd

Irwin L. Morris

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199873821.003.0006

This chapter provides a test of relative advantage theory at the substate level. Specifically, the growth of Republican identification is analyzed at the parish level in Louisiana and the county level in North Carolina annually from 1966 to 2008. The results indicate that black political mobilization is a statistically significant predictor of Republican registration rates in both post-Voting Rights Act (VRA) Louisiana and North Carolina. The findings in this chapter again provide empirical confirmation supporting the theory of relative advantage as a key explanation for the political transformation of the South over the last half-century. This chapter ends with a brief discussion of where the current politics of the region fits into U.S. national politics.

Keywords:   Louisiana, North Carolina, Republican growth, black mobilization, relative advantage, county, parish, VRA

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