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Sounding the GalleryVideo and the Rise of Art-Music$
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Holly Rogers

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199861408

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199861408.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 November 2019

Composing with Technology

Composing with Technology

The Artist-Composer

Chapter:
(p.11) 1 Composing with Technology
Source:
Sounding the Gallery
Author(s):

Holly Rogers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199861408.003.0001

This chapter uses the specificities of analogue video to argue that the genre has a double lineage that runs through music and art histories. The theoretical work of Gene Youngblood, André Gaudreault and Philippe Marion and Yvonne Spielmann is used to situate early video art-music within the expansive multimedia culture of the 1960s. Contrasting the electromagnetic basis of the medium with the technologies of film and television, the issues of transmission, preservation and deliberation are used to demonstrate how the simultaneity of the video signal enabled image and sound to be produced, projected and manipulated at the same time. Nam June Paik, Steina Vasulka, Robert Cahen, Tony Conrad and Bill Viola provide examples of musically-trained artists who embraced video as an audiovisual agent for transformation. With the experimental nature of these musicians in mind, video art-music is discussed as a form of visual noise-composition able to produce a form of live intermedia.

Keywords:   Video art-music, visual noise-composition, transformation, Nam June Paik, Steina Vasulka, Bill Viola, simultaneity, intermedia, Yvonne Spielmann, Gaudreault and Marion

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