Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Christ among the MessiahsChrist Language in Paul and Messiah Language in Ancient Judaism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Matthew V. Novenson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199844579

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199844579.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 July 2019

Names, Titles, and Other Possibilities

Names, Titles, and Other Possibilities

Chapter:
(p.64) 3 Names, Titles, and Other Possibilities
Source:
Christ among the Messiahs
Author(s):

Matthew V. Novenson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199844579.003.0004

This chapter addresses the question whether the word “Christ” in Paul is used as a title or as a proper name. It is argued, against current majority opinion, that it is not the case that titles have sense while names have only reference, and that in Paul’s linguistic context, anyway, there were many more onomastic categories than just those two. A survey of ancient Jewish, Greek, and Roman onomastics reveals that “Christ” in Paul functions syntactically neither as a name nor as a title but rather as an honorific, an adopted epithet that can either stand with or stand in for the bearer’s personal name (e.g., Antiochus Epiphanes, Caesar Augustus, Shimon bar Kokhba, Jesus Christ).

Keywords:   honorific, onomastics, proper name, reference, sense, title

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .