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Brain Aromatase, Estrogens, and Behavior$
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Jacques Balthazart and Gregory Ball

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199841196

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841196.001.0001

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Modulation of Central Auditory Processing by a Brain-Generated Estrogen: Rapid Effects on Neural Coding, Discrimination, and Behavior

Modulation of Central Auditory Processing by a Brain-Generated Estrogen: Rapid Effects on Neural Coding, Discrimination, and Behavior

Chapter:
(p.453) Chapter 24 Modulation of Central Auditory Processing by a Brain-Generated Estrogen: Rapid Effects on Neural Coding, Discrimination, and Behavior
Source:
Brain Aromatase, Estrogens, and Behavior
Author(s):

Liisa A. Tremere

Raphael Pinaud

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841196.003.0024

Beyond the traditional roles of estrogens, especially 17β-estradiol (E2), in the regulation of reproductive, aggressive and mnemonic functions, recent findings conclusively demonstrate that E2 also directly impacts sensory function. More specifically, studies conducted in songbirds reveal that E2 is produced by central auditory neurons and that this brain-generated hormone rapidly affects neuronal physiology to modify auditory-based behaviors. This chapter discusses key findings on this rapidly emerging field. In particular, this chapter examines the anatomical and neurochemical organization, along with the experience-dependent activation, of E2-producing and E2-sensitive neurons in the songbird auditory forebrain. This chapter further discusses findings indicating that auditory experience rapidly modulates the site-specific production of E2 in behaving animals, and that such rises in neurohormonal levels rapidly enhance neurophysiological responses in the awake-brain.

Keywords:   auditory, discrimination, estrogen, information coding, memory, perception

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