Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Brain Aromatase, Estrogens, and Behavior$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jacques Balthazart and Gregory Ball

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199841196

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841196.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 October 2019

A Historical and Personal Perspective on the Aromatization Revolution: Steinach Confirmed 1

A Historical and Personal Perspective on the Aromatization Revolution: Steinach Confirmed 1

Chapter:
(p.281) Chapter 15 A Historical and Personal Perspective on the Aromatization Revolution: Steinach Confirmed1
Source:
Brain Aromatase, Estrogens, and Behavior
Author(s):

Per Södersten

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841196.003.0015

About a hundred years ago, transplantation of gonads to hosts of the opposite sex was reported to cause behavioral sex reversal and when synthetic androgens and estrogens became available somewhat later, treatment with estradiol was found to activate all aspects of sexual receptivity in adult castrated male rats. At the same time, it was suggested that estradiol synergizes with androgens in the brain to activate ejaculation in castrated male rats, and evidence was presented that male rats convert androgens to estrogen. Many of these effects have been confirmed recently, but no attempts have been made to confirm the remarkable demonstration, more than half a century ago, that adult castrated male rats can maintain normal cyclic ovarian function. History is more than enjoyable reading, it is essential reading to avoid making mistakes already made and avoid inventing the wheel more than once.

Keywords:   gonadal hormones, gonadal transplantation, history, sexual behavior, sex differences, sex similarities

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .