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Brain Aromatase, Estrogens, and Behavior$
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Jacques Balthazart and Gregory Ball

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199841196

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841196.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2019

The Aromatization Hypothesis and the Discovery of Estrogen Synthesis by Brain Cells

The Aromatization Hypothesis and the Discovery of Estrogen Synthesis by Brain Cells

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter 1 The Aromatization Hypothesis and the Discovery of Estrogen Synthesis by Brain Cells
Source:
Brain Aromatase, Estrogens, and Behavior
Author(s):

Frederick Naftolin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841196.003.0001

Although the discovery that brain cells could make estrogen from androgen precursors derived from the need to understand the basis of brain sexual differentiation, the consequences of this observation have been far reaching in the fields of neurobiology and endocrinology. An historical account of the events leading up to the discovery and insights to the involved people are presented. As with many scientific observations, more questions were raised than were answered by proof of the “Aromatization Hypothesis.” However, knowing that this metabolism exists has opened the possibility of further progress in brain research and allied fields.

Keywords:   brain sexual differentiation, estrogen, estrogen synthetase, hormone, synaptic plasticity

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