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Greening the Red, White, and BlueThe Bomb, Big Business, and Consumer Resistance in Postwar America$
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Thomas Jundt

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199791200

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199791200.001.0001

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The “New” Conservation

The “New” Conservation

Chapter:
(p.158) 6 The “New” Conservation
Source:
Greening the Red, White, and Blue
Author(s):

Thomas Jundt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199791200.003.0007

President Lyndon B. Johnson voiced broad environmental concerns in what he dubbed the “new” conservation. He signed into law the Wilderness Act in 1964, helping to ease growing fears expressed by Raymond Dasmann and others over decreasing diversity. Growing environmental awareness was met with an increasing number of environmental concerns in the sixties, including global warming, worsening pollution, oil spills, nuclear power, and increased pressure to develop scenic areas. Paul Ehrlich’s popular book, The Population Bomb, stoked fears of overpopulation. The Johnson administration ushered in new environmental laws, but in the end regulations were watered down by corporate influence and enforcement was often lax. Chemical defoliants used in the Vietnam War, including Agent Orange, caused further concerns.

Keywords:   Lyndon B. Johnson, new conservation, Paul Ehrlich, Agent Orange, Wilderness Act

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