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Greening the Red, White, and BlueThe Bomb, Big Business, and Consumer Resistance in Postwar America$
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Thomas Jundt

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199791200

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199791200.001.0001

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“A Ground Swell of Public Indignation”

“A Ground Swell of Public Indignation”

Chapter:
(p.127) 5 “A Ground Swell of Public Indignation”
Source:
Greening the Red, White, and Blue
Author(s):

Thomas Jundt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199791200.003.0006

By the late 1950s there were growing concerns about the damaging effects of consumption. Environmentalists were in the avant-garde of limiting consumption, and they had an expanding green marketplace where they could do so. Journalist William Longgood’s popular book, The Poisons in Your Food (1960), further popularized the trend. Attacks against him and other advocates of green consumption betrayed the threat that many of those in power believed green consumers posed to the status quo. President John F. Kennedy was pushed to take notice of the growing environmental concern, but his proposals remained locked in traditional notions of progressive conservation. Record fallout from atomic testing inspired environmental consumer campaigns and a milk boycott, finally leading to an atmospheric test ban treaty in 1963. But, further inspired by Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1963), the question of how to deal with the planetary, cultural, and political threat posed by corporate capitalism remained.

Keywords:   William Longgood, green marketplace, milk boycott, test ban treaty, Rachel Carson

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