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The Impossibility of PerfectionAristotle, Feminism, and the Complexities of Ethics$
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Michael Slote

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199790821

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199790821.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.123) Conclusion
Source:
The Impossibility of Perfection
Author(s):

Micheal Slote

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199790821.003.0008

Despite the major disagreements with Aristotle, this book agrees with him in allowing for the possibility of nonreductive and objective value judgments. But it argues that such judgments have to be made in a more qualified manner than has previously been acknowledged, and this leads to a much richer and more complex picture of ethical values than we have from Aristotle. But such a picture could in all probability only have arisen in the more complex world we now inhabit—where issues of individual rights vs. collective welfare, ethnic and religious pluralism within societies, international conflicts, and feminist thinking all generate philosophical questions and difficulties that were harder to recognize in earlier times.

Keywords:   Aristotle, complexity, dependent values, eudaimonism, feminism, objectivity, partial values, perfection, rights

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