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Political Theology for a Plural Age$
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Michael Jon Kessler

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199769285

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199769285.001.0001

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Is the King a Democrat? The Politics of Islam in Morocco

Is the King a Democrat? The Politics of Islam in Morocco

Chapter:
(p.108) 5 Is the King a Democrat? The Politics of Islam in Morocco
Source:
Political Theology for a Plural Age
Author(s):

Paul Heck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199769285.003.0006

This chapter explores the democratic side of contemporary politics in Morocco by examining the Islamic religious principles that shape understandings of the polity. It focuses on two factors that contribute to a democratic outlook: firstly, the recognition on the part of the rulers that rule exists for the sake of society’s interests as a whole and not only those of the elite; and, secondly, the assumption on the part of the people that they are capable of self-governance. The chapter first looks at the form of governance in Morocco, which is a constitutional monarchy, and the ways in which power is understood to be limited, implying, in theory, that individuals enjoy a measure of personal inviolability vis-à-vis power. It then examines the understanding of freedom in Islam and the way in which it has been invoked for the sake of self-determination in Morocco.

Keywords:   contemporary politics, Islamic religious principles, democracy, self-governance, freedom, self-determination

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