Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Thrift and Thriving in AmericaCapitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Joshua Yates and James Davison Hunter

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199769063

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199769063.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 July 2019

Moderation in the First Era of Popular Consumption

Moderation in the First Era of Popular Consumption

Chapter:
(p.139) 6 Moderation in the First Era of Popular Consumption
Source:
Thrift and Thriving in America
Author(s):

Joyce Appleby

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199769063.003.0006

This chapter shows how anxiety over the status of luxury only grew more acute in the transition from colonial hardship to national prosperity in the era of the early Republic. Fear of famine was largely eliminated, concentration on bare survival made way for concern with economic growth, and ordinary people began to produce, and enjoy on a large scale, “goods to comfort and adorn body and home.” While moderation, restraint, and self-discipline—variations on the theme of thrift—were not abandoned, their religious and moral justifications were gradually supplemented and in some cases replaced by instrumental and economic ones.

Keywords:   thrift, national prosperity, early Republic, economic growth

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .