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Unruly MediaYouTube, Music Video, and the New Digital Cinema$
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Carol Vernallis

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199766994

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766994.001.0001

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Reciprocity, Bollywood, and Music Video

Reciprocity, Bollywood, and Music Video

Mani Ratnam’s Dil Se and Yuva

Chapter:
(p.116) Chapter 6 Reciprocity, Bollywood, and Music Video
Source:
Unruly Media
Author(s):

Carol Vernallis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766994.003.0006

Bollywood musical sequences circulate widely but they have inspired very few analyses that consider dance, costume, and cinematography in relation to song. This chapter argues that the musical numbers in Ratnam’s Yuva problematize both North American music videos and traditional Hindi cinema—two traditions that are already hybridized. The chapter acknowledges the limits to these cross-cultural intersections and mutual influences in order to get at each practice’s specificity. Musical sequences in Hindi cinema contain genre markers that may not be compatible with North American videos, including rapid shifts among lush locations, sharply etched choreography, an iconography of textiles, layering of figures in the frame, and characters who focus on each other rather than address the viewer. Many features of North American music video appear in Hindi cinema, although music video’s reliance on sexual display has not been adopted.

Keywords:   Aesthetics, digital, audiovisual, music video, Bollywood, the musical, Mani Ratnam, Yuva, Hindi cinema, cross-cultural, genre

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