Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
On Biblical Poetry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

F.W. Dobbs-Allsopp

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199766901

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766901.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 12 December 2019

“Verse, Properly So Called”

“Verse, Properly So Called”

The Line in Biblical Poetry

Chapter:
(p.14) 1 “Verse, Properly So Called”
Source:
On Biblical Poetry
Author(s):

F. W. Dobbs-Allsopp

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766901.003.0002

The chapter focalizes the issue of the poetic line in biblical poetry. In particular, attention is dedicated, one, to issues of discernment—what are the kinds of evidences that positively show the existence and importance of the line in biblical Hebrew verse—and, two, to scrutiny of the nature and character of the line so revealed—in what does this line consist. Some initial observations are offered on how the line factors prosodically in a poem’s various structures of meaning, and the topic of line grouping also comes in for discussion, both as a means for triangulating on the line as a structural singularity and because biblical poetry is dominantly distichic, its lines come mostly grouped in pairs, as couplets, with the triplet (a gathering of three poetic lines) otherwise being the most common complementing alternative grouping scheme attested in the biblical corpus.

Keywords:   line, biblical poetry, couplet, triplet, grouping

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .