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The INS on the LineMaking Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954$
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S. Deborah Kang

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199757435

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199757435.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 January 2020

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The INS on the Line
Author(s):

S. Deborah Kang

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199757435.003.0001

The introduction presents the book’s main argument that the INS on the US–Mexico border made and remade the nation’s immigration laws over the course of the twentieth century. This claim challenges popular and scholarly notions that the INS functioned primarily as a law enforcement agency, administering laws issued by Congress and the courts, and, instead, underscores the multiple ways in which the local branches of one federal agency defined American immigration law and policy. While the INS in the Southwest often created these measures in a highly haphazard and reactive fashion, they ultimately came to shape the capacities of the American state on the US-Mexico border. The introduction further discusses the implications of this argument for the study of the American administrative state, immigration law and policy history, and borderlands history. It closes with chapter summaries of the book.

Keywords:   INS, Border Patrol, immigration law, borderlands, administrative state

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