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The Rabbi's Atheist DaughterErnestine Rose, International Feminist Pioneer$
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Bonnie S. Anderson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199756247

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199756247.001.0001

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Dissention, Division, Departure

Dissention, Division, Departure

Chapter:
(p.118) 7 Dissention, Division, Departure
Source:
The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter
Author(s):

Bonnie S. Anderson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199756247.003.0008

Chapter 7 describes Ernestine Rose’s life from 1861 to 1869, when she and William returned to England. The Civil War temporarily ended the women’s movement, saw an increase in religious belief, and witnessed the decline of free thought. In 1864, Horace Seaver, editor of the atheist Boston Investigator, which Rose read every week, published a series of antisemitic editorials. Rose rebutted him, but unsuccessfully. After the war, the women’s movement divided over the 15th Amendment, which gave black men, but no women, the vote. Rose consistently backed the rights of black women and advocated equal rights for all. Increasingly ill during these years, Rose ceded her leadership position to Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Keywords:   Ernestine Rose, antisemitism, Civil War, Disunion, Horace Seaver, Boston Investigator, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Women’s Loyal League, equal rights, feminism

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