Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Just Wars, Holy Wars, and JihadsChristian, Jewish, and Muslim Encounters and Exchanges$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sohail H. Hashmi

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199755042

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755042.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 June 2019

Religious Services for Byzantine Soldiers and the Possibility of Martyrdom, c. 400–c. 1000

Religious Services for Byzantine Soldiers and the Possibility of Martyrdom, c. 400–c. 1000

Chapter:
(p.25) 1 Religious Services for Byzantine Soldiers and the Possibility of Martyrdom, c. 400–c. 1000
Source:
Just Wars, Holy Wars, and Jihads
Author(s):

Paul Stephenson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755042.003.0001

This chapter argues that there was no unequivocal ancient Christian ban against the use of violence; that the rigorism of the Church fathers was not universal; and that from the essential messiness of early Christian thought on war emerged ideas that were adopted into early Islamic thought, notably the very idea of martyrdom in battle, as articulated in the reign of Heraclius (d. 641). The focus is on two episodes in the eighth and ninth centuries, where Byzantine thought was, in turn, influenced by Islamic doctrine and practice, notably the introduction of iconoclasm (from c. 730), the notion of martyrdom in battle (with examples from after 811), and the desire to emulate waqf foundations to support and finance campaigns (c. 895).

Keywords:   violence, iconoclasm, Byzantine Empire, Heraclius, martyrdom

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .