Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
RetributivismEssays on Theory and Policy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mark D. White

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199752232

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199752232.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 July 2019

What Might Retributive Justice Be? An Argument for the Confrontational Conception of Retributivism

What Might Retributive Justice Be? An Argument for the Confrontational Conception of Retributivism

Chapter:
(p.49) 3 What Might Retributive Justice Be? An Argument for the Confrontational Conception of Retributivism
Source:
Retributivism
Author(s):

Dan Markel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199752232.003.0004

This chapter offers the first dedicated treatment of Markel’s Confrontational Conception of Retributivism, which is designed to show both the internal intelligibility of retributive punishment situated in a liberal democracy and the limits that attach to the pursuit of that social project of retributive justice. Similar to but distinct from Duff’s account, the version of retributivism that the chapter offers focuses on the confrontational (not just communicative) encounter that occurs when the state inflicts some level of coercion upon an offender who has been adjudicated through fair and reasonable procedures of violating an extant and justifiable legal norm. This is essentially a legal or institutional view of retributive punishment, and thus necessarily concerned with the consequences of running such an institution alongside other important social projects, two themes taken up by several other contributors to this volume.

Keywords:   retributivism, punishment, justice, confrontational conception of retribution, liberal democracy, institutionalism, confrontation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .