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The Nature and Functions of Dreaming$
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Ernest Hartmann

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199751778

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199751778.001.0001

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Connection as Combination. Connection as Condensation. Connection as Metaphor. The Dream as Picture-Metaphor

Connection as Combination. Connection as Condensation. Connection as Metaphor. The Dream as Picture-Metaphor

Chapter:
(p.49) 7 Connection as Combination. Connection as Condensation. Connection as Metaphor. The Dream as Picture-Metaphor
Source:
The Nature and Functions of Dreaming
Author(s):

Ernest Hartmann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199751778.003.0007

Hyper-connectivity in dreaming, and connectivity at the entire right-hand end of the continuum are an extremely important characteristics of our mental functioning, which has not been adequately discussed and integrated in the literature. This chapter starts by discussing connections in terms of some simple or widely used terms, such as combination and condensation. It also discusses cross connection and the crossing of boundaries. It then looks at connections in terms of creating metaphor—an essential aspect of connections in dreaming. In a broad semantic sense, making connections is metaphor. Metaphor is ubiquitous in our language and in our thought. It is especially prominent as we move along the continuum from focused-waking-thought to dreaming. Metaphor is not merely the noting of similarities, but using similarity to picture or explain something in simpler, more picture-able terms. Thus, something complex such as “life” or “a relationship” is often pictured as a trip by car, a journey, but the emotion determines what sort of journey is pictured.

Keywords:   metaphor, combination, condensation

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