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Aristotle as PoetThe Song for Hermias and Its Contexts$
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Andrew L. Ford

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199733293

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199733293.001.0001

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Ethos

Ethos

Chapter:
(p.113) Chapter 7 Ethos
Source:
Aristotle as Poet
Author(s):

Andrew Ford

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199733293.003.0007

The song to Hermias now takes center stage again, this time using its literary background to highlight the multiple generic stances adopted by the speaker. The song’s opening verses are examined in light of the rhetorical categories of ethos—the speaker’s character as projected by the poem—and pathos—the effects on the audience. A poem by Sappho and an Attic skolion are studied to show that Aristotle blended hymnic form with an old poetic game in which singers discoursed on what is “the finest thing” in life. This heritage suggests that the song’s ethos and pathos have much in common with contemporary protreptic literature. The traditional quality of such a poetic posture and the possibilities it offered for creative expansion and variation are brought out by comparing a very similar discourse on virtue in Sophocles’ Philoctetes.

Keywords:   rhetoric, ethos, protreptic, epiphany, Sappho, Attic skolia, Prodicus’ Choice of Heracles, Sophocles Philoctetes

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