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Growing GapsEducational Inequality around the World$
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Paul Attewell and Katherine S. Newman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199732180

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199732180.001.0001

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Entrance into Prestigious Universities and the Performance of Groups That Have Been Discriminated Against on the Vestibular

Entrance into Prestigious Universities and the Performance of Groups That Have Been Discriminated Against on the Vestibular

Black Students in the University of São Paulo, 2001–2007

Chapter:
(p.59) 3 Entrance into Prestigious Universities and the Performance of Groups That Have Been Discriminated Against on the Vestibular
Source:
Growing Gaps
Author(s):

Antonio S. A. Guimarães

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199732180.003.0003

This chapter provides a case study of educational fairness or equity in Brazil, focusing on the intake of black and public school students by the elite University of São Paolo (USP). Brazil has long been proud of the high quality of its public universities, both federal and state institutions. Young people from many sectors of society—both the elite and the poor—aspire to enter them. However, admission is highly competitive and depends on a student's score on an entrance exam, the Vestibular. Children from socially and economically privileged families, who typically attend private high schools, tend to do well on this exam. Children from lower class backgrounds do less well and are therefore underrepresented at USP.

Keywords:   educational inequality, Brazil, University of São Paolo, public universities, black students, poor students

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