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Growing GapsEducational Inequality around the World$
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Paul Attewell and Katherine S. Newman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199732180

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199732180.001.0001

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Educational Inequality in Latin America

Educational Inequality in Latin America

Patterns, Policies, and Issues

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 Educational Inequality in Latin America
Source:
Growing Gaps
Author(s):

Cristián Cox

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199732180.003.0002

This chapter provides an overview and analysis of changes in the educational systems of Latin American countries. The first section sketches the general picture of educational inequality in the region, compares income inequality, and distinguishes the different development agendas for the quite different levels of development that exist among the countries of the region. The second section describes the main components of educational reform in the Latin American region for the period 1990–2006, and discusses their impact on the historical patterns of inequality in the social distribution of education. The third section examines available data about years of education and grade completion by countries and social categories, by way of assessing the expansion of access to education by different generations and different socioeconomic categories. The fourth section describes learning outcomes in six Latin American countries and analyses their association with socioeconomic and institutional factors, as well as comparing them with selected OECD countries. This permits an assessment of the region's educational structures in terms of equity of their results. A final section returns to policy issues.

Keywords:   Latin America, educational system, educational inequality, income inequality, educational reform, education policy

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