Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Foreign Cults in RomeCreating a Roman Empire$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Eric Orlin

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199731558

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731558.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 October 2019

Foreign Cults in Rome

Foreign Cults in Rome

Chapter:
(p.31) 1 Foreign Cults in Rome
Source:
Foreign Cults in Rome
Author(s):

Eric M. Orlin (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731558.003.0001

Chapter 1 opens with a survey of the foreign divinities admitted to Rome in the fifth and fourth centuries, including those imported both from Italian cities and from Greece or other overseas territories. Although foreign cults from around the Mediterranean have attracted more scholarly attention, many cities in Italy were also considered foreign, as the evocatio of Juno Regina from Veii in 396 attests. The Roman action in regard to Juno Sospita at the conclusion of the Latin Revolt in 338 is especially noteworthy, as the Romans set out to remake their relationship with Latium at this time. Roman behavior shows them either incorporating foreign divinities into their system or involving themselves in communal sanctuaries outside Rome, both of which aimed at strengthening connections between themselves and their neighbors in central Italy.

Keywords:   evocatio, Latin revolt, Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, Latium, foreign cults, Veii

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .