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Winckelmann and the Invention of AntiquityHistory and Aesthetics in the Age of Altertumswissenschaft$
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Katherine Harloe

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199695843

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199695843.001.0001

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‘Kennzeichen der griechischen Meisterstücke’: Winckelmann’s early Roman writings and the discourse of connoisseurship

‘Kennzeichen der griechischen Meisterstücke’: Winckelmann’s early Roman writings and the discourse of connoisseurship

Chapter:
(p.65) 3 ‘Kennzeichen der griechischen Meisterstücke’: Winckelmann’s early Roman writings and the discourse of connoisseurship
Source:
Winckelmann and the Invention of Antiquity
Author(s):

Katherine Harloe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199695843.003.0003

Chapter 3 discusses the writings Winckelmann published from Rome and Florence before his Geschichte der Kunst des Alterthums in order to demonstrate the importance to them of eighteenth-century discourses of connoisseurship. The close relation that obtained between the activities of eighteenth-century connoisseurs and antiquarians is explored, and Winckelmann’s works, including his descriptions of Philipp von Stosch’s collection of engraved gems and of the Torso Belvedere, are analysed in detail in order to show how his approach to the periodization and visual analysis of artefacts was influenced by connoisseurial methods developed by Jonathan Richardson, Caylus, and Mariette, among others. The chapter closes with a discussion of Winckelmann’s role in making public the antiquities newly discovered at Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Keywords:   connoisseurship, Jonathan Richardson, Caylus, Mariette, Pompeii, Herculaneum, antiquarians, visual analysis, Torso Belvedere, gems

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