Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Perception, Causation, and Objectivity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman, and Naomi Eilan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199692040

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199692040.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 June 2019

Causal Perception and Causal Cognition

Causal Perception and Causal Cognition

Chapter:
(p.229) 14 Causal Perception and Causal Cognition
Source:
Perception, Causation, and Objectivity
Author(s):

Jim Woodward

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199692040.003.0014

This chapter explores the role played by the so-called perception of causation in our more general capacity for causal thinking. I suggest that ordinary adult human causal cognition as well as a great deal of philosophical and psychological theorizing about such cognition is influenced by two different conceptions of causation, one of which is associated with the idea that causes make a difference for their effects and the other of which is associated with idea that causes must be appropriately “connected” to their effects. These conceptions are logically distinct and can yield different causal judgments but are nonetheless usually well-integrated in adult causal thinking. An important developmental question is how such integration occurs.

Keywords:   causal perception, causal judgment, causal process theories, causal learning, development of causal reasoning

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .