Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Iambus and ElegyNew Approaches$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Laura Swift and Chris Carey

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199689743

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199689743.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 June 2020

Mapping Iambos: Mining the Minor Talents

Mapping Iambos: Mining the Minor Talents

Chapter:
(p.122) 6 Mapping Iambos: Mining the Minor Talents
Source:
Iambus and Elegy
Author(s):

Chris Carey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199689743.003.0007

The Alexandrian editors saw three serious talents in the remains of archaic iambos, Archilochos, Semonides, and Hipponax. But the genre was widely practised across the Greek world in the archaic and classical periods This chapter looks firstly at the Alexandrian canon of the iambists and sets this against Alexandrian editorial practice to determine how much survived and in what form and how far the Alexandrian editors extended their editorial practice (as distinct from their commentary writing) beyond the canonical works. It then surveys the iambographic corpus from two angles, thematic range and geographical dissemination, before looking briefly at the evidence for the persistence of the form over time and offering a possible explanation for the fact that iambus outlasts lyric as a living poetic form.

Keywords:   iambus, Archilochus, Hipponax, Semonides, Ananius, Hermippus, canon, Alexandrian editions

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .