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Agricultural Input SubsidiesThe Recent Malawi Experience$

Ephraim Chirwa and Andrew Dorward

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199683529

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199683529.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 November 2019

(p.xiii) List of Tables

(p.xiii) List of Tables

Source:
Agricultural Input Subsidies
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

  1. 1.1 Annual changes in cereal production from 1961 and 2000 3

  2. 1.2 Fertilizer use, cereal yields, and value of cereal production, 2002–9 4

  3. 2.1 Effects of demand and supply inelasticities on consumer and producer gains and on deadweights 18

  4. 2.2 Critical aspects of input subsidy programmes 44

  5. 4.1 Social and economic indicators for Malawi, 1975 to 2005 64

  6. 5.1 Principal programme features, 2005/6 to 2011/12 91

  7. 5.2 Evolving programme implementation features, 2005/6 to 2011/12 92

  8. 5.3 Fertilizer procurement prices before and after removal of high outliers 100

  9. 5.4 Estimates of fertilizer coupon issues and receipts from different sources 103

  10. 5.5 Scoring on different programme elements by year 108

  11. 5.6 Coupon redemption parameters, 2005/6 to 2011/12 111

  12. 5.7 Reported distances to buy inputs, time spent buying inputs, and costs for transport and miscellaneous expenses 112

  13. 5.8 Reported extra payments for coupon redemption 113

  14. 5.9 Estimated shares of coupon and subsidized fertilizer receipts by smallholders and others 117

  15. A5.1 Estimated programme costs, 2005/6 to 2011/12 122

  16. 6.1 Beneficiary household level impact indicators and hypotheses 127

  17. 6.2 Distribution of sample and number of seasons with access to subsidized fertilizer 128

  18. 6.3 Summary of findings on direct subsidy impacts 142

  19. 7.1 Economic growth performance, 2000–10 148

  20. 7.2 Average nominal maize prices, 2001–11 154

  21. 7.3 Household food consumption over the past 1 month, 2006/7–8/9 160

  22. 7.4 Trends in poverty headcount in Malawi, 1998–11 163

  23. (p.xiv)
  24. 7.5 Nutritional status of children under 5 years, 2000–11 164

  25. 8.1 Household survey estimates of total seed purchases 174

  26. 8.2 Quantity of subsidized and commercial fertilizers by IHS2 poverty status 181

  27. 8.3 Number of seed suppliers to the subsidy programme, 2006/7–11/12 183

  28. 8.4 Size of the seed component of the subsidy programme, 2007/8–11/12 185

  29. 8.5 Inputs actually obtained against those wanted by farmers in 2010/11 189

  30. 9.1 Broad characteristics of three model types 201

  31. 9.2 Base benefit–cost analysis, 2005/6–10/11 212

  32. 9.3 Benefit–cost analysis without and with growth multipliers 214

  33. 9.4 Alternative estimates of returns to FISP investments, 2005/6–10/11 214

  34. 10.1 Programme objectives and their implications for targeting 223

  35. 10.2 Major changes in targeting processes, 2005/6–9/10 227

  36. 10.3 Fertilizer coupon receipts per household, 2006/7–10/11 231

  37. 10.4 Mean attributes of households by number of fertilizer subsidy coupons received, 2008/9 232

  38. 10.5 Estimates for factors affecting access to subsidized fertilizer in 2008/9 234

  39. 10.6 Marginal effects from probit estimates of intra-household fertilizer use 239

  40. 11.1 Graduation processes, requirements, and sequencing of changes 254