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Voices at WorkContinuity and Change in the Common Law World$
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Alan Bogg and Tonia Novitz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199683130

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199683130.001.0001

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Indigenous Voices at Work

Indigenous Voices at Work

Chapter:
(p.96) 5 Indigenous Voices at Work
Source:
Voices at Work
Author(s):

Paul Roth

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199683130.003.0005

‘Indigenous Voices at Work’ surveys workplace issues that have faced Indigenous people in the common law countries of New Zealand, Australia, the United States, and Canada. Colonization deprived many Indigenous people of their land, and set them on the road to social and economic marginalization. Historically, they lacked much of a voice because of their location away from urban centres, their concentration in the primary sector, and their low numbers in the industrialized workforce. They were sometimes regarded as potential competitors by settler workers; excluded from employment due to a lack of education, skills, and training; and were victims of racism and discrimination. In recent times, unions have become more attentive, whether it is to advance their social justice agendas or to address declining union densities. There are, however, some areas of tension between worker and Indigenous voice, as Indigenous values do not always sit comfortably alongside contemporary workers’ rights.

Keywords:   indigenous people, employment, discrimination, racism, New Zealand, Australia, the United States, and Canada

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