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Worklife Balance – The Agency and Capabilities Gap | Oxford Scholarship Online
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Worklife Balance: The Agency and Capabilities Gap

Barbara Hobson

Abstract

Across welfare societies we have seen the emergence of policies and norms for worklife balance alongside rising expectations among working parents to be able to participate in employment and caregiving, and to have more time for family life and leisure. Yet despite this value placed upon worklife balance, working parents face increasing work demands, as well as rising numbers of insecure and precarious jobs. Both of which produce a deepening sense of economic uncertainty in everyday life, which has been intensified in the current period of financial crises. The agency and capabilities gap add ... More

Keywords: worklife balance, Sen, capabilities, agency gap, gender, welfare

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2013 Print ISBN-13: 9780199681136
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199681136.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Barbara Hobson, editor
Professor of Sociology, Stockholm University

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Contents

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Part I The Individual/Household and the Agency and Capabilities Gap: Policy Frameworks, Norms, and Work Organizational Cultures

3 A sense of entitlement? Agency and capabilities in Sweden and Hungary

Barbara Hobson, Susanne Fahlén, and Judit Takács

4 Worklife balance in Japan: new policies, old practices

Mieko Takahashi, Saori Kamano, Tomoko Matsuda, Setsuko Onode, and Kyoko Yoshizumi

Part II The Firm Level and the Agency and Capabilities Gap: Policies, Managers, and Work Organization

6 Workplace worklife balance support from a capabilities perspective

Laura den Dulk, Sandra Groeneveld, and Bram Peper

8 Capabilities for worklife balance: managerial attitudes and employee practices in the Dutch, British, and Slovenian banking sector1

Bram Peper, Laura den Dulk, Nevenka Černigoj Sadar, Suzan Lewis, Janet Smithson, and Anneke van Doorne-Huiskes

10 Conclusion

Barbara Hobson

End Matter