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The Rise of the Regulatory State of the SouthInfrastructure and Development in Emerging Economies$
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Navroz K. Dubash and Bronwen Morgan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199677160

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199677160.001.0001

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Judiciaries as Crucial Actors in Regulatory Systems of the Global South: The Indian Judiciary and Telecom Regulation (1991–2012)

Judiciaries as Crucial Actors in Regulatory Systems of the Global South: The Indian Judiciary and Telecom Regulation (1991–2012)

Chapter:
(p.136) 7 Judiciaries as Crucial Actors in Regulatory Systems of the Global South: The Indian Judiciary and Telecom Regulation (1991–2012)
Source:
The Rise of the Regulatory State of the South
Author(s):

Arun K. Thiruvengadam

Piyush Joshi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199677160.003.0007

When the state is unable to carry out the regulatory, redistributional, and developmental functions characterizing much of the developing world, the role of governance and service delivery also falls to a myriad of private actors. This chapter shows how private actors like NGOs and local community groups undertake so-called ‘regulatory mobilization’ to influence the new rules of the service delivery game, as well as to deliver much needed basic services to urban poor communities. Based on extensive fieldwork carried out in the Philippines, the chapter explains the politics of the informal sector at the edge of the regulatory state. More than a decade since the privatization of the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System in Metro Manila in 1997, water access for the urban poor remained limited as privatized water utilities faced difficulties in extending service provision. In the context of an unpredictable regulatory landscape and an oligarchic patrimonial state, unexpected collective action by organized urban poor communities and NGOs took place around water as a subsistence right. Depending on how local and sectoral politics are conflated, such regulatory mobilization can sometimes not only result in obtaining subsistence goods, but may also occasionally project countervailing power in the policy sector, and influence formal regulatory frameworks in surprising ways.

Keywords:   informal sector, mobilization, urban water, privatization, Philippines, regulation

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