Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Rise of the Regulatory State of the SouthInfrastructure and Development in Emerging Economies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Navroz K. Dubash and Bronwen Morgan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199677160

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199677160.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 January 2020

The Regulatory State Under Stress: Economic Shocks and Regulatory Bargaining in the Argentine Electricity and Water Sectors

The Regulatory State Under Stress: Economic Shocks and Regulatory Bargaining in the Argentine Electricity and Water Sectors

Chapter:
(p.115) 6 The Regulatory State Under Stress: Economic Shocks and Regulatory Bargaining in the Argentine Electricity and Water Sectors
Source:
The Rise of the Regulatory State of the South
Author(s):

Alison E. Post

M. Victoria Murillo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199677160.003.0006

This chapter examines the contract renegotiations between Argentina's provincial governments and private investors holding concession contracts in the country's electricity distribution and water sectors following the country's 2001–02 economic crisis. It focuses on two aspects of post-crisis contract renegotiations: first, it examines the circumstances under which firms and host governments are able to conclude contract renegotiations; second, it looks at factors associated with investor exit from their concession contracts. The analysis shows that regulation in the aftermath of crises is an inherently political process. Rather than leaving regulation to formally independent regulators, government ministers negotiated directly with investors regarding ongoing terms of operation and eventual revisions to their concession contracts. These negotiations dealt with distributive issues of major importance and salience, the most important of which was who would bear the costs of the country's economic crisis.

Keywords:   water supply, electricity, public utilities, contract renegotiations, private investors, concession contracts, economic crisis

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .