Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Conan DoyleWriting, Profession, and Practice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Douglas Kerr

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199674947

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199674947.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 September 2019

Army and Empire

Army and Empire

Chapter:
(p.159) 6 Army and Empire
Source:
Conan Doyle
Author(s):

Douglas Kerr

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199674947.003.0006

Conan Doyle's lifetime coincided with the zenith of the British Empire. His English historical novels of adventure were Conan Doyle's form of national epic, their heroes exemplifying the bravery, selflessness and gaiety which he believed sustained the Empire of his own day. While the adventure genre was a popular alternative to the novel of domestic realism, it gave Conan Doyle, like Stevenson, a reputation as a writer for the young, specifically boys, at odds with his epic ambitions. From the Sudan to the Western Front, he was an enthusiastic war reporter and historian, an unconditional admirer of the British soldier. He saw Britain's oriental Empire primarily as a military responsibility, but came in later life to view Britain and its white dominions as a potential spiritual (or Spiritualist) empire, to which he was a tireless missionary.

Keywords:   historical novel, adventure fiction, imperial romances, war reporting, boys’ fiction, boer War, first world war, empire - spiritualism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .