Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Constitution of the Criminal Law$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

R.A. Duff, Lindsay Farmer, S.E. Marshall, Massimo Renzo, and Victor Tadros

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199673872

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199673872.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 July 2019

Puzzling About State Excuses as an Instance of Group Excuses

Puzzling About State Excuses as an Instance of Group Excuses

Chapter:
(p.119) 7 Puzzling About State Excuses as an Instance of Group Excuses
Source:
The Constitution of the Criminal Law
Author(s):

François Tanguay-Renaud

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199673872.003.0007

This chapter is concerned with the state as a target of criminalization in a very direct sense: to what extent can the state be a criminal offender? If states can be criminalized for what they do, what doctrines of criminal responsibility apply to them? What renders the state responsible for what it has done, and how might responsibility be undermined? What might justify the state in committing a wrong? And what might excuse it? The idea that the state can be excused for wrongdoing seems, at first blush, difficult to swallow, but the chapter shows that it is, in fact, far more plausible than it first appears.

Keywords:   state, criminalization, criminal offenders, criminal responsibility

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .