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International DevelopmentIdeas, Experience, and Prospects$
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Bruce Currie-Alder, Ravi Kanbur, David M. Malone, and Rohinton Medhora

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199671656

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199671656.001.0001

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Transitional Justice and Development

Transitional Justice and Development

Chapter:
(p.412) Chapter 24 Transitional Justice and Development
Source:
International Development
Author(s):

Pablo de Greiff

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199671656.003.0025

Although transitional justice and development measures are frequently deployed in the same contexts, efforts to establish direct links between transitional justice and development are still nascent. Recent political events such as the “Arab Spring” movements, along with trends in thinking about development, suggest that programs within the two fields will be better integrated in the future. This chapter aims to clarify why such integration is desirable, and argues that development programs instituted in contexts where massive human rights violations have taken place should confront the legacies of such abuses. Justice is an inherent part of development, and also contributes instrumentally to the conditions that development requires. In particular, transitional justice may help societies overcome weakened agency and the depletion of civic trust by fostering recognition and promoting trust, effects that appeal to two main social mechanisms: norm-affirmation and the articulation and disarticulation of groups both formal and informal within society.

Keywords:   transitional justice, rule of raw, civic trust, social capital, human rights, development

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