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The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity$
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Anna Marmodoro and Jonathan Hill

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199670567

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199670567.001.0001

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Author and speaker(s) in Horace’s Satires 2

Author and speaker(s) in Horace’s Satires 2

Chapter:
(p.152) (p.153) 5 Author and speaker(s) in Horace’s Satires 2
Source:
The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity
Author(s):

Stephen Harrison

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199670567.003.0006

This chapter looks at the complex construction of the relationship between author and speaker in the second book of Horace’s Satires (30 BCE). The first book of Satires (35 BCE) had (apart from one poem) been narrated in the poet’s first-person voice and provided an apparently self-revelatory poet of Horace and his career. The second book of Satires, on the other hand, introduces a succession of other speakers who take over from the satirist, either presenting poems as monologues or acting as dominating interlocutors in dialogues; a number of these speakers can be argued to represent aspects of Horace’s character, and this chapter explores the idea that characters other than the poet-narrator may in fact reveal just as much about him as his own first-person voice.

Keywords:   Horace, Satires, Plato, narrative techniques

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