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Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind$
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Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin, and Jon Robson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199669639

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199669639.001.0001

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The Limits of Aesthetic Empiricism

The Limits of Aesthetic Empiricism

Chapter:
(p.75) 4 The Limits of Aesthetic Empiricism
Source:
Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind
Author(s):

Fabian Dorsch

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199669639.003.0005

In this chapter, Dorsch argues against empiricist positions which claim that empirical evidence can be sufficient to defeasibly justify aesthetic judgements, or judgements about the adequacy of aesthetic judgements, or sceptical judgements about someone’s capacity to form adequate aesthetic judgements. First, empirical evidence provides neither inferential, nor non-inferential justification for aesthetic opinions. Second, while empirical evidence may tell us how we do respond aesthetically to artworks, it cannot tell us how we should respond to them. And, third, empirical insights into the irrationality of many of our aesthetic judgements do not warrant the sceptical conclusion that we ought to refrain from forming aesthetic opinions. As a consequence of these limitations to aesthetic empiricism, we should endorse the rationalist position that aesthetic criticism is largely a matter of reasoning and, moreover, a collective undertaking.

Keywords:   aesthetic judgement, empiricism, rationalism, aesthetic appreciation, aesthetic properties, aesthetic value

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