Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Death or Disability?The 'Carmentis Machine' and decision-making for critically ill children$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dominic Wilkinson

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199669431

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199669431.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 May 2020

Sources of Uncertainty—Prognostic Research

Sources of Uncertainty—Prognostic Research

Chapter:
(p.162) 5 Sources of Uncertainty—Prognostic Research
Source:
Death or Disability?
Author(s):

Dominic Wilkinson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199669431.003.0010

There are a number of different factors that contribute to uncertainty in prognosis. This chapter looks at the science of prognosis, and the example of birth asphyxia. In practice, one substantial contributor to uncertainty in prognosis is the way in which research into prognosis has been performed and reported. Self-fulfilling prophecies are a serious problem for prognostic studies. There are a number of ways in which prognostic research studies could and should be modified. This chapter also looks at research into the quality of life of children with disability. Studies have mostly been undertaken in ways that make it hard to apply predictions of quality of life to particular patients. This may be improved in future research; however, the hardest problem is likely to remain. Those patients where assessments of quality of life are potentially the most important are also the ones where it is the most difficult.

Keywords:   uncertainty, prognosis, predictions, self-fulfilling prophecy, quality of life, disability, research

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .