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Hans Christian ØrstedReading Nature's Mind$
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Dan Ch. Christensen

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199669264

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199669264.001.0001

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| 1805 | 1805 Rivalry and Love

| 1805 | 1805 Rivalry and Love

Chapter:
(p.177) 18 | 1805 Rivalry and Love
Source:
Hans Christian Ørsted
Author(s):

Dan C. Christensen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199669264.003.0018

Ørsted meets considerable opposition from professor Bugge at the University and considers seeking a professorship in Germany, possibly Munich to work together with Ritter. Ørsted's natural philosophy and performance as a lecturer is reconstructed. He takes advantage of the experience gained during his grand tour, especially from Charles. Ritter insinuates a love affair with a certain Charlotte, who follows his lectures on experimental physics. In the Scandinavian Literary Society Ørsted delivers a fanciful lecture on the analogy between electrical figures and organic forms, which draws heavily on Steffens and Schelling. It was not included in his collected works, so he probably regretted it. The problem of analogous thinking is scrutinized. Later on Ørsted declared that in a period of philosophical fermentation and confusion, and therefore he had used his lectures to fly kites and discuss them with his audience.

Keywords:   Ørsted's rivalry with Bugge, Ørsted as a lecturer, a love affair with a certain Charlotte? A fanciful lecture, analogous inference, flying kites

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